Tuesday, May 3, 2011

10 comments MVP Announcement Comes a Tad Early, No?

Maybe I'm alone in this (as I seem to be in a lot of things I write on this blog), but the NBA's announcement of the league's MVP seems to come a little early every year. In the perfect twist of irony, the Bulls got manhandled by the Hawks at home in Game 1 directly after the news went public. Not that this was a surprise to anyone, but the NBA seems to love to sabotage the playoff team with the MVP. Most year's the MVP comes from the best, if not one of the best, team's in the NBA's regular season. And most likely, we will see them in the second round. As if the lower seeds needed more motivation, they get to salivate as they watch their opponent get draped with NBA honors.

Last season, LeBron heard the news the day after Game 1. What happened in game 2? The Celtics won by 18. Obviously two years is not enough to establish a pattern, but that's not the point. Regardless of whether the MVP's team wins or loses the following game, the NBA is almost taunting the lower seed: "Not only do you suck, but you have to play against the league's best player. Good luck!" Now maybe the league wants the underdog to win. As long as the Knicks aren't the favorite (which they seemingly won't be for a while), I'm okay with that. Watching a team coast through the regular season only to go home after a two week span brings laughter to my heart. But I'm not totally cruel. You're the favorite for the reason, and you shouldn't have to fight against the NBA's ploys.

Obviously this shouldn't be enough for the favorite to lose. If you blame the MVP's announcement on your series loss, you're clearly not looking in the right direction. Although I would have loved if LeBron went up to the podium after game six last season and proclaimed that it was the combination of his bogus elbow injury, a desire to play somewhere else and the MVP award that made him lose, followed by a media vote as to which one was actually true.

Clearly this entire post discusses a topic of minimal importance, but it's just another of David Stern's quirks that rubs me the wrong way.

10 comments:

koleslaw said...

They either need to announce it right before the playoffs or announce it after the playoffs. The problem with that is that the playoffs aren't supposed to factor into the decision of the MVP and even if the voting happened before the playoffs, people would totally think the playoffs affected the voting.

Pat said...

The best example is 95 when the Rockets watched David Robinson win the MVP on for Hakeem Olajuwon to destroy him in the Series.

Bengoodfella said...

Koleslaw, I sort of agree with you. By waiting until the playoffs start people get the impression the playoffs were taken into account, even if this isn't true at all.

Pat, I remember that. It was just embarrassing for Robinson. I almost, just almost felt bad for Robinson the way Olajuwon handed it to him.

Martin F. said...

At least the RoY should be before the MVP. If they feel the need to announce the MVP during the playoffs, do it right after the Conference Finals. the player might not be playing, so less distraction, and give people something else to talk about before the Finals.

Bengoodfella said...

Martin, I would agree with that. I don't see why the RoY vote can't come after the season is over. The MVP should probably wait until after the conference finals or after the NBA Finals.

Why can't the MVP voting has something to do with the playoffs? Don't factor it in heavily, but if LeBron James tears it up against Derrick Rose in the playoffs, it should be factored in just a little bit, no?

JimA said...

Why can't the MVP voting has something to do with the playoffs? Don't factor it in heavily


It's human nature to weigh playoff performance heavily, as that is the most important time of the season. Don't they have an award for playoff MVP already?

Bengoodfella said...

JimA, I am not sure they have one for the entire playoffs, but they do have one for the Finals.

I know human nature would be to go with the closest thing that just happened, which would be how a player performed in the playoffs. I guess that's the answer. We couldn't trust the voters enough to not weigh the playoffs too heavily.

Dylan said...

I'm in favor of holding off all announcements until after the season is over. The ballot should be cast the day the regular season ends. I don't think there's a need for a distraction during the playoffs, because playoff basketball is pretty intriguing by itself. Awards announcements could also be another way to segue between the playoffs and the lead up to the NBA Draft.

your favourite sun said...

The year Dirk won it his team didn't make it to the second round of the playoffs. I would hope that was enough to convince most people that regardless of when the announcement is made the playoffs aren't taken into account...

Bengoodfella said...

Sun, that is an instance where playoffs aren't taken into account. I don't know the right time to announce the MVP really. I do feels like it comes out a bit early though. The playoffs should have a small impact, but not much.